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Shape & Material Descriptions

Wedding dresses come in a lot of options.  Here is a checklist of wedding dress terms to help you find the style that's perfect for you!

The Length

The Difference Between Fit and Flare and Mermaid and Trumpet.
The silhouette of fit and flare wedding dresses is similar to the trumpet silhouette and the mermaid silhouette, and the three are often thought of as interchangeable terms, describing the same style. However, there are a few characteristics that can be used to differentiate the three styles.

So, what's the difference between the fit and flare and the mermaid? And what's the difference between the fit and flare and the trumpet?


• The Fit and Flare flares right below the hip
• The Mermaid flares at or below the knee
• The Trumpet flares gradually, at approximately mid-thigh

 

Trains.

A small swish of a train that trails about six inches on the floor. This style (sometimes also called a "brush" train) is a good choice for outdoor brides who want a touch of glamour without too much fabric dragging on the ground, or indoor brides who prefer something more simple and low-key.

Chapel: A train that extends 12 to 18 inches along the floor and is slightly longer than the sweep. This is the most common style, it's great for brides who want a more serious train without a lot of fuss. The overall look is elegant without being too heavy.

Cathedral: This train extends 22 or more inches along the floor and gives the dress a much more formal look. Cathedral-style gowns usually have a removable train or bustling option.

Semi-Cathedral: A train that is halfway between chapel and cathedral length.

Royal or Monarch: A train that extends a yard or more on the floor. It's the most dramatic option and often requires assistance from a flower girl. Princess Diana of England wore a 25-foot train, while Kate Middleton's train was just under nine-feet long.

 

Fabrics.

A wedding dress can be made from either taffeta silk or polyester. How the fiber is woven determines if the dress is:

Charmeuse: is a lightweight fabric woven with a satin weave, in which the warp threads cross over three or more of the backing (weft) threads. The front of the fabric has a satin finish—lustrous and reflective—whereas the back has a dull finish. It can be made of silk or a synthetic lookalike such as polyester. Silk charmeuse is more expensive and delicate but is softer and a better insulator. Polyester charmeuse is cheaper and can often withstand machine washing, but it does not breathe as well as silk. Charmeuse differs from plain satin in that charmeuse is softer and lighter in weight.

Chiffonfrom the French word for a cloth or rag, is a lightweight, balanced plain-woven sheer fabric woven of alternate S- and Z-twist crepe (high-twist) yarns. The twist in the crepe yarns puckers the fabric slightly in both directions after weaving, giving it some stretch and a slightly rough feel. Chiffon is made from cotton, silk, or synthetic fibers. Under a magnifying glass it resembles a fine net or mesh which gives chiffon some see-through properties. Chiffon can be dyed to almost any shade, but chiffon made from polyester can be difficult to dye.

Crepe: Light, soft, and thin, with a wrinkled surface. Sheer, lightweight fabric named after the couturiere Georgette de la Plante. A crepe-surfaced plain weave silk or synthetic fabric with alternating S and Z twist yarns in both warp and weft. 

Duchesse Satin: A lightweight hybrid of silk or polyester and rayon woven into a satin finish. An elegant and lustrous fabric, duchesse satin is shiny, heavy, and luxurious. Often used for couture wedding gowns or extravagant home decor, it has been around since ancient China. Silk weavers made this textile with many layers of delicate fibers that created a soft texture with a lot of body and sheen. It is a popular choice for wedding gowns because it drapes well, helping to create full and beautiful skirts.

Dupioni silk: A finish similar to shantung, but with thicker, coarser fibers, and a slight sheen.  is a plain weave crisp type of silk fabric, produced by using fine thread in the warp and uneven thread reeled from two or more entangled cocoons in the weft. This creates tightly-woven yardage with a highly-lustrous surface. It is similar to shantung, but slightly thicker, heavier, and with a greater slub (cross-wise irregularity) count. Dupioni is often woven with differing colors of threads scattered through the warp and weft. This technique gives the fabric an iridescent effect, similar to but not as pronounced as shot silk taffeta. Dupioni can be woven into plaid and striped patterns; floral or other intrinsic, intricate designs are better suited for lighter-weight silks and/or those with smoother finishes, although dupioni may be embroidered in any manner desired. Along with shantung, dupioni is popular in bridal and other formal wear. It is suitable for upholstery, but if it is crafted into a curtain or drape, a substantial underlining must be used to protect the fabric from sunlight.

Georgette: Sheer and lightweight, dull-finished crêpe fabric named after the early 20th century French dressmaker Georgette de la Plante.

Originally made from silk, Georgette is made with highly twisted yarns. Its characteristic crinkly surface is created by alternating S- and Z-twist yarns in both warp and weft. Georgette is made in solid colors and prints and is used for blouses, dresses, evening gowns, Saris, and trimmings. It is springier and less lustrous than the closely related chiffon.

Mikado: A brand of blended fibers, usually heavier than 100-percent silk. is a weave that typically has a glossy surface and a dull back. The satin weave is characterized by four or more cool fill or weft yarns floating over a warp yarn or vice versa, four warp yarns floating over a single weft yarn. Floats are missed interfacings, where the warp yarn lies on top of the weft in a warp-faced satin and where the weft yarn lies on top of the warp yarns in weft-faced satins. These floats explain the even sheen, as unlike in other weaves, the light reflecting is not scattered as much by the fibres, which have fewer tucks. Satin is usually a warp-faced weaving technique in which warp yarns are "floated" over weft yarns, although there are also weft-faced satins. If a fabric is formed with a satin weave using filament fibres such as silk, nylon, or polyester, the corresponding fabric is termed a satin, although some definitions insist that the fabric be made from silk. If the yarns used are short-staple yarns such as cotton, the fabric formed is considered a sateen.

Organza: Crisp and sheer like chiffon, with a stiffer texture similar, but more flowing than tulle.is a thin, plain weave, sheer fabric traditionally made from silk. Many modern organzas are woven with synthetic filament fibers such as polyester or nylon. Silk organza is woven by a number of mills along the Yangtze River and in the province of Zhejiang in China. A coarser silk organza is woven in the Bangalore area of India. Deluxe silk organzas are woven in France and Italy. Organza is used for bridalwear and eveningwear. 

Satin: heavy and smooth with a high sheen on one side. is a weave that typically has a glossy surface and a dull back. The satin weave is characterized by four or more cool fill or weft yarns floating over warp yarn or vice versa, four warp yarns floating over a single weft yarn. Floats are missed interfacings, where the warp yarn lies on top of the weft in a warp-faced satin and where the weft yarn lies on top of the warp yarns in weft-faced satins. These floats explain the even sheen, as unlike in other weaves, the light reflecting is not scattered as much by the fibres, which have fewer tucks. Satin is usually a warp-faced weaving technique in which warp yarns are "floated" over weft yarns, although there are also weft-faced satins. If a fabric is formed with a satin weave using filament fibres such as silk, nylon, or polyester, the corresponding fabric is termed a satin, although some definitions insist that the fabric be made from silk. If the yarns used are short-staple yarns such as cotton, the fabric formed is considered a sateen.

Shantung: Similar to a raw silk, characterized by its rough/nubby textured. It is a type of silk fabric historically from the province of Shandong. It is similar to Dupioni, but is slightly thinner and less irregular. Shantung is often used for bridal gowns.

Taffeta: Crisp and smooth, smooth, plain woven fabric made from silk or cuprammonium rayons. The word is Persian in origin and means "twisted woven." It is considered to be a "high-end" fabric, suitable for use in ball gowns, wedding dresses, and interiors for curtains or wallcovering. It is also widely used in the manufacture of corsets and corsetry: it yields a more starched-like type of cloth that holds its shape better than many other fabrics. An extremely thin, crisp type of taffeta is called paper taffeta.

There are two distinct types of silk taffeta: yarn-dyed and piece-dyed. Piece-dyed taffeta is often used in linings and is quite soft. Yarn-dyed taffeta is much stiffer and is often used in evening dresses. Shot silk taffeta was one of the most sought-after forms of Byzantine silk, and may have been the fabric known as purpura.[3]

Tulle: Netting is a lightweight, very fine netting, which is often starched. It can be made of various fibres, including silk, nylon, and rayon. Tulle is most commonly used for veils, gowns (particularly wedding gowns), and ballet tutus. Tulle comes in a wide array of colors and it can also easily be dyed to suit the needs of the consumer. It is readily available.

 

If you still have any questions after reading this article, do not hesitate to send us a message!

FROM OUR BLOG

By BudgetBridalWorld.com
on 2015-05-09


We have been working on the website www.BudgetBridalWorld.com for many months and from many different locations.

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